Run-of-River hydropower and salmonids: potential effects and perspective on future research

  Small hydropower production, and more specifically Run-of-River (RoR) hydropower, has become an important source of renewable electricity worldwide in recent decades and increasingly, an alternative to large reservoir storage hydropower dams. Although individual RoR hydropower projects are often small in size and footprint, their potential effects on salmonids, and river ecosystems in general, should…

Adding up the green: what yields the biggest bang for your conservation buck?

Our new study in the journal Ecological Economics  weighs the biological and economic tradeoffs of recovery for the endangered Oregon spotted frog, and aims to improve conservation decision-making for other threatened species.   Canada and the United States arguably have some of the strongest species at risk legislation in the world. While the legislation provides a blueprint for…

Work by the Palen Lab featured in the Tacoma News Tribune

Rob Carson and Dean Koepfler from the Tacoma News Tribune have produced a great multi-media piece on how climate change is affecting Mt. Rainier National Park. The story highlights some of the work that the Palen lab is doing to explore the consequences of a changing climate for high-elevation amphibians in the Pacific Northwest.

Ian Holmes from Island Radio interviews Rylee Murray about bullfrog invasions in BC

American bullfrogs have been invading British Columbia’s south coast and Vancouver Island wetlands since the 1940’s. They are fierce predators and competitors of wetland fauna and have been attributed to declines of native amphibian populations and ecosystem degredation in the Pacific Northwest and around the world. Although researchers and government wildlife managers are still unsure…